Category : Ecommerce


Some of the bulk and complexity of modern web pages is necessary. Larger images sell more products. Third-party scripts help you to better understand your visitors. But there’s a lot of unnecessary weight on most web pages. Rather than focusing exclusively on all the cool new features you want to add to your site this year, spend some time thinking about what you can take away. Here are four tips to help you get started.


Last week, I had the pleasure of being invited to speak at the CMG’s annual Performance & Capacity Conference. One of my sessions was a presentation of Radware’s research into mobile web stress. The other was a brand-new talk that I’m frankly kind of surprised I’ve never done before: a shallow dive into the topic of measuring the financial impact of slow performance versus the financial impact of outages…


Mobile has never been more crucial to business success than it is right now. More than half of all time spent on retail sites takes place on a mobile device. The average online shopper makes 6.2 visits to a company’s website, using 2.6 devices, before they buy. And just a one-second delay in mobile load times can hurt conversions and cart size by up to 3.5%.

This is why sites need to perform quickly and consistently across all platforms. This is why it’s critical for site owners to have visibility into the real-world mobile performance of their sites. And this is why, every year at Radware, we study the mobile performance of the top 100 ecommerce sites to see how they measure up to user expectations.

Our latest report — the 2014 State of the Union: Mobile Page Speed and Web Performance — is now available for download. Today, I want to share some of our key findings and takeaways…


Every quarter at Radware, we release a new “state of the union” report, with key findings about the web performance of the world’s most popular ecommerce sites.

Every quarter, we find that the median top 100 ecommerce site takes longer to render feature content than it took the previous quarter.

Every quarter, we field the question: But how could this possibly be happening? Networks, browsers, hardware… they’re all getting better, aren’t they?

The answer to this question is: Pages are slower because they’re bigger, fatter, and more complex than ever. Size and complexity comes with a performance price tag, and that price tag gets steeper every year.

In this post, I’m going to walk through a few of the key findings from our latest report. Then I’m going to share a few examples of practices that are responsible for this downward performance trend.


Last week, we released our quarterly State of the Union for ecommerce web performance, which, among other things, found that the median top 100 retail site takes 6.2 seconds to render primary content and 10.7 seconds to fully load. We also found that the median page is 1677 KB in size — 67% larger than it was just one year ago, when the median page was 1007 KB.

These findings and more — including Time to Interact and Load Time for the ten fastest sites — are illustrated in this poster-style set of infographics.